PJHC Fall 2017 Courses

Information subject to change. Please verify course offerings and times in the Course Schedule. Page last updated 3/28/17.

CORE COURSES

HUMA/SOCI 371: Poverty Justice, and Human Capabilities, Strassmann
TR 10:50 AM–12:05 PM
Distribution Group I
This course provides an overview of the study of poverty, justice, and human capabilities. The course considers theory and economic policy oriented towards improving human well-being in the US, Asia, Africa, and other regions. Readings address not just material deprivations but also gender, racial and ethnic disparities, health status, education, human rights, and political freedoms. To be considered for the course, please complete the brief questionnaire at pjhc.rice.edu/enrollment-questionnaire. Preference is given to those that have declared the PJHC minor. Formerly HUMA/SOCI 280. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HUMA 371 and HUMA 280/SOCI 280.


CAPSTONE COURSES

HIST 421: Race, Education, and Society in the Urban South, Byrd
W 7–9:50 PM
An examination of urban life and education since the decision in Brown v. Board. Seminar focuses on the Brown cases, the development of the post war city in the context of American race relations, the course of court-ordered desegregation, and the impact of recent reforms on urban schools and neighborhoods. Open to juniors and seniors. Open to others only with permission of instructor. (Please note that class rank is determined by year of matriculation, not credits.) Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HIST 421 and HIST 521.

SOCI 469: Community Bridges Training, Whitehead
TBA
This course is the precursor for the spring course, SOCI 470, Inequality and Urban Life. Only students accepted into the Community Bridges Program may enroll in this course, where we do preparatory readings, trainings and workshops for the spring community internships.

SWGS 394: Pre-Seminar in Engaged Research, Riedel
M 12–12:50 PM
This course prepares students for the Spring semester and practicum sequence (496 and 497) by establishing a baseline of skills in research design and filing paperwork with the Institutional Review Board at Rice and elsewhere as needed.


NON-WESTERN ELECTIVES

ASIA 328: Modern Girl and Asia in the World, Barlow
MWF 2–2:50 PM
Using the textbook “The Modern Girl Around the World,” this course examines the phenomenon of the so-called modern girl in Asia and the world, 1890-1949. Topics include: modernity, consumer culture, sexuality, and liberation.

HIST 251: Continuities and Changes in Brazilian History,
De Souza Maia
TR 4–5:15 PM
Distribution Group I
An exploration of themes essential to understanding modern Brazil, such as the origins of a multi-racial society, the transition from monoculture to industry, authoritarian and democratic trends, the emergence of a uniquely Brazilian culture, and the conflicts – environmental, political, and economic – over the development of the Amazon.

HIST 271: History of South Asia, Balabanlilar
TR 2:30–3:45 PM
Distribution Group I
Introduction to the history of the cultural, religious, economic and political systems of South Asia, beginning with the development of world religious systems such as Hinduism and Buddhism, indigenous state-building, the rise of Islamic power, emergent European colonialism, and subsequent resistance movements which resulted in South Asian independence in mid-20th century.

HIST 330: Atlantic Slave Trade and the Origins of Afro America, Byrd
TR 8–9:15 AM
An examination of black society, culture, and politics from the late 15th century through the late 18th century (focusing geographically on the Caribbean, and on black life within what is now Mexico and the United States).

HIST 342: Modern China, Barlow
MWF 4–4:50 PM
Distribution Group I
 A survey of Chinese history from c. 1800 to the present, focusing on the related themes of imperialism, nationalism, modernization and revolution.

RELI 111: Introduction to African Religions, Bongma
TR 9:25–10:40 AM
Distribution Group I
Introduction to the structures of African religions through readings. Topics include community, cosmology, ritual, ethical values, magic, witchcraft, spirit possession, contribution to nationalism, social change, religion and art, and transplantation of African Religions in the Americas.

RELI 315: Gender and Islam, Shehabuddin
W 1–3:30 PM
Explores the lives of Muslim women in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and North America; analyze constructions of gender in the Islamic world over time, the challenges faced from such diverse quarters as colonial administrators, Western feminists, and states, as well as movements and individuals within the Muslim world.


RACE AND ETHNICITY COURSES

ENGL/SPPO 471: Chicano/a Literature, Aranda
MWF 1–1:50 PM
A variable topics course designed to build on student knowledge of chicano/a literature and culture gained earlier in the curriculum. Past topics have included the Chicano/a novel, and Transitions and Translations Chicano/a Autobiography. Repeatable for Credit.

HIST 251: Continuities and Changes in Brazilian History,
De Souza Maia
TR 4–5:15 PM
Distribution Group I
An exploration of themes essential to understanding modern Brazil, such as the origins of a multi-racial society, the transition from monoculture to industry, authoritarian and democratic trends, the emergence of a uniquely Brazilian culture, and the conflicts – environmental, political, and economic – over the development of the Amazon.

HIST 266: Slavery and the Founding Fathers, Sidbury
MW 2–3:15 PM
Distribution Group I
Course will explore the Founding Fathers’ attitudes towards slaves, towards slavery, and towards racial difference, beginning with interpretations of the Founders as a group, and moving to case studies of individual founders. Students will write a paper about the engagement with slavery of one person from the founding generation.

HIST 421: Race, Education, and Society in the Urban South, Byrd
W 7–9:50 PM
An examination of urban life and education since the decision in Brown v. Board. Seminar focuses on the Brown cases, the development of the post war city in the context of American race relations, the course of court-ordered desegregation, and the impact of recent reforms on urban schools and neighborhoods. Open to juniors and seniors. Open to others only with permission of instructor. (Please note that class rank is determined by year of matriculation, not credits.) Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HIST 421 and HIST 521.

SOCI 437: Sociology of Education, Turley
W 2–4:50 PM
Analyzing educational inequality in the U.S. using concepts of educational equality and inequality and analysis of the factors that shape schooling outcomes. Addressing the role of students, families, neighborhoods, schools, school organizations and teachers. Special topics: education of immigrants, school segregation, accountability, higher education and the future of educational inequality. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for SOCI 437 and SOCI 337/SOCI 537.

SOCI 451: Immigration, Ecklund
M 1–3:50PM
This course compares 20th century immigration to the US (and other countries) with more recent migratory flows. Topics will be related to the transnational identities of immigrants, ethnic discrimination, and the impact of immigrants on civic and religious institutions. A central part of the course is a semester-long research project. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for SOCI 451 and SOCI 551.

SWGS/JWST 348: Sex and Gender in Modern Jewish Culture, Weininger
TR 2:30–3:45 PM
How has Jewish identity historically been constructed as gendered, and how has that affected Jewish self-perception and -representation as well as the representations of others? This course explores the intersection between gender and Jewishness from several different historical and cultural perspectives, using literature, film, and philosophy. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for SWGS 348 and RELI 347/SWGS 347.


GENERAL ELECTIVES

ECON 481: Health Economics, Ho
TR 9:25–10:40 AM
Study of determinants of health, including behavioral, economic and social factors and access to health care. Application of economics to understand health insurance, the hospital and physician markets, pharmaceuticals, and the health care system. Effects of regulation and methods of payment. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for ECON 481 and ECON 565.

ENGL 382: Feminist Theory, Hennessey
M 1–3:50 PM
A course focusing on concepts that drive and divide social movements centered on gender equality, women’s issues, and sexual identity in the two-thirds and one-third world, among them feminism; the body; race; labor; rights, needs, and desires.

GLHT 201: Introduction to Global Health, Leautaud Sunderland
TR 2:30–3:45 PM
Distribution Group 3
This course provides an overview of contemporary challanges and advances to improve human health. The course opens with an introduction to the epidemiology and physiology of the major human health problems throughout the world. With this introduction, we examine medical technologies to prevent infection, detect cancer and treat heart disease. The course is designed for non-engineering / non-science majors.

HEAL 222: Principles of Public and Community Health, Perkins
MWF 9–9:50 AM
Distribution Group 3
Principles of Public & Community Health examines aspects of the community that relate to health including health issues within community subgroups; identification and analysis of community health programs; organizational patterns and functions of voluntary and governmental health agencies and coordination of community health programs.

HEAL 380: Disparities of Health in America, Hughes
M 6–8:29 PM
This course explores the aspects of race and ethnicity that influence health, public health policy, and the management and practice of healthcare, as well as, the trends which drive ethnic demographic transition including an aging white population, declining white birth rate, immigration of non-whites, and the higher birth rate of minority groups. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for HEAL 380 and HEAL 580.

HIST 340: History of Feminism, Wildenthal and Kodama
TR 1–2:15 PM
Explores feminism as political thought and social movement in various times and places. Readings will include classic as well as non-canonical texts. We will consider the historical contexts of feminist action, and examine controversies over and within feminisms.

SOCI 319: Sociology of Work and Occupations, Chavez
TR 4–5:15 PM
Work is a central part of our lives. We will examine how work is structured in occupations and industries and how it changes over time. We will focus on understanding the lives of workers: work and inequalities between men and women, racial/ethnic inequalities, and relations between work and family.

SOCI 345: Medical Sociology, Kimbro
TR 1–2:15 PM (Section 1)
Distribution Group 2
This course will explore the relationship between social factors and health, illness, and mortality, with a heavy emphasis on experiences of illness, the doctor-patient relationship, and the socialization of medical students and new doctors. Social determinants of health, cultural determinants of health, and the ethics surrounding conception, birth, and death will also be discussed.

SWGS 101: Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (Section 1), Shehabuddin
Distribution Group 1
TR 1–2:15 PM
Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality- An introductory survey of issues in the study of gender, such as women’s social, political, and legal status in the US and globally; feminist perspectives on sexuality, race, the body, globalization, labor, culture; and the implications of these perspectives for social and critical theory. The course also introduces the concept of engaged research and the public service components of feminist activity.

SWGS 101: Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality (Section 2), Alvarez Astacio
Distribution Group 1
TR 10:50 AM–12:05 PM
Introduction to the Study of Women, Gender, and Sexuality- An introductory survey of issues in the study of gender, such as women’s social, political, and legal status in the US and globally; feminist perspectives on sexuality, race, the body, globalization, labor, culture; and the implications of these perspectives for social and critical theory. The course also introduces the concept of engaged research and the public service components of feminist activity.