PJHC Courses Spring 2017

Page last updated 11/8/16

CORE COURSES

SOCI/SWGS 394: Human Development in Global and Local Communities, López-Alonso
TR 10:50 AM–12:05 PM
This course explores poverty and gender in local and global communities. Readings consider human deprivations and well-being in the context of social norms, gender relations, and governmental structures. Also examined are policies meant to improve human capabilities, including both the overall effects of such policies and their differential consequences for children, women and men.


CAPSTONE COURSES

SOCI 470: Inequality and Urban Life, Bancroft
F 2–3:30 PM
This course combines classroom study with seven hours of fieldwork per week, working on projects with a local organization. We study how urban areas generate wealth and poverty, the experience of inequality, and issues of community development. Enrollment is by permission only.

SWGS 470: Advanced Seminar in Poverty, Justice, and Capabilities, Shehabuddin
W 1–3:30 PM
Through interdisciplinary readings, this seminar explores how global, national, and domestic structures and institutions influence the day-to-day lives and capabilities of different groups and individuals. We will study historical and contemporary efforts by activists and policymakers to confront social inequities. ASIA 329 or SOCI 372 or SWGS 322 or SOCI 394 or SWGS 394 may be taken concurrently with SWGS 470.

SWGS 496: Engaged Research Practicum, Valdez
TBA
An applied research complement to the Seminar consisting of six hours/week participating in a research-based project at a local public service agency that addresses the needs of women or is focused on gender and/or sexuality related work. Planning for the practicum takes place during the previous fall semester in consultation with the SWGS Director. Practicum projects are presented to a public audience. Permission of the instructor and some background in the study of women, gender or sexuality required.

SWGS 497: Engaged Research Seminar, Valdez
W 3–5:30 PM
Taken in conjunction with SWGS 496, the Seminar develops students’ research skills and situates the practicum project within a range of perspectives on feminist theory and practice, grassroots organizing, and policy-making around the issues of women, gender, and sexuality, for example, domestic violence, gender and the prison industry, reproductive freedom, the feminization of AIDS. Permission of the instructor and some background in gender or sexuality studies are required.


NON-WESTERN ELECTIVES

HIST 228: Modern Latin America, TBA
MW 2–3:15 PM
Course introduces the student to the history of contemporary Latin America. For the most part political events will provide the periodic framework of the course, but we shall also consider major economic, social and cultural developments to understand the complex social formations that comprise contemporary Latin American societies.

HIST 232: African History: East, Central, and Southern Africa, Staller
TR 10:50 AM–12:05 PM
History of societies of East, Central and Southern Africa, earliest times to the present. Through primary sources like vocabulary from dead languages, art, archaeological remains, photographs, oral traditions, and journalists’ accounts, we explore Swahili origins, Great Zimbabwe, African slavery, colonialism, independence, Rwandan genocide, and themes like ethnicity, gender, and poverty.

RELI 348: Christianity and Islam in Africa, Bongma and Cook
TR 2:30–3:45 PM
This course will focus upon the history and conflict of Christianity and Islam in Africa, with emphasis placed upon indigenous African developments, cultural and artistic themes, and conversion narratives as well as exploring the co-existence and conflict of the two major faiths of the continent. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for RELI 348 and RELI 536.


RACE AND ETHNICITY COURSES

ENGL 371: Chicano/a Literature, Aranda
MWF 11–11:50 AM
A mixed-genre course focusing on the Chicano movement, the Chicano renaissance, and alternative literary and mythic traditions associated with them.

JWST 238: Becoming Americans: The Jewish Immigrant Experience in the United States, Furman
MW 2–3:15 PM
Special topic for Spring 2017. This course examines the history of the American Jewish immigrant experience from colonial times to the present as a means of trying to understand how newcomers navigate the processes of adaptation, acculturation, and integration into American life. We will travel to Galveston and New York City to visit significant historical sites and immigrant communities. Repeatable for credit.

POLI 330: Minority Politics, Marschall
TR 1–2:15 PM
Examination of the political and social position of minority groups (African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, Latinos, and women) in the U.S. This course explores the political power and behavior of these groups. The key concepts include racism, discrimination, resources, political power, culture, leadership, class, and inequality.

SOCI 301: Social Inequality, Turley
MW 2–3:15 PM
This course investigates the causes and consequences of social inequality in the U.S., focusing on inequality by class, race, and gender. We will discuss different measures of inequality, the extent of inequality, as well as classical and modern theories for why it has been increasing since the 1970s. In addition, we will discuss how much inequality is justifiable and which redistributive programs work.

SOCI 363: African American-Jewish Relations, Furman
MWF 9–9:50 AM
This course examines African American-Jewish relations in the United States from colonial times to the present day. Through readings, music, images, and films, we will explore constructions of racial identity, arenas of religious and cultural interaction, and the politics and politics that have shaped African American-Jewish relations in urban neighborhoods.

SOCI 470: Inequality and Urban Life, Bancroft
F 2–4:50 PM
This course combines classroom study with seven hours of fieldwork per week, working on projects with a local organization. We study how urban areas generate wealth and poverty, the experience of inequality, and issues of community development. Enrollment is by permission only.


GENERAL ELECTIVES

ANTH 381: Medical Anthropology, Mitchell
TR 1–2:15 PM
Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the world. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for ANTH 381 and ANTH 581.

BIOE 360: Appropriate Design for Global Health, Richards-Kortum
TR 1–2:15 PM
Seminar-style introductory design course covering epidemiology, pathophysiology, health systems, health economics, medical ethics, humanitarian emergencies, scientific and engineering design methods, and appropriate health technology case studies. To register, you must be enrolled in the GLHT minor and submit a 250 statement to beyondtraditionalborders@rice.edu by Monday of preregistration. The minor and course prerequisite is waived for students majoring in Bioengineering.

ENGL 354: Queer Literary Cultures, Lamos
MWF 10–10:50 AM
An introduction to queer literary theory by reading works in several genres, from Sappho to the present day, including Shakespeare, Dickinson, Tennyson, Whitman, Proust, Stein and Woolf.

PHIL 307: Social and Political Philosophy, Sher
MWF 3–3:50 PM
This course examines some philosophical problems raised by society and the state. Topics to be discussed include the sources of political authority, the justification of punishment, the significance of national boundaries, and the distribution of wealth.

SCI 425: Population Health Seminar, Gorman
W 1–3:50 PM
Course is a graduate level overview of population health, including the social determinates of morbidity and mortality, fertility and birth outcomes, health disparities, and contextual determinants of health. Course will cover major theoretical perspectives in the field, including fundamental cause theory, life course theory, and theories of stress and resilience. Mutually Exclusive: Credit cannot be earned for SOCI 425 and SOCI 525.

SWGS 201: Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies, Riedel
TR 1–2:15 PM
Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, & Transgender Studies – An introduction to the interdisciplinary examination of sexual desires, sexual orientations, and the concept of sexuality, with a focus on the construction of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender identities. The course looks at how identities interact with other social phenomena such as government, family, popular culture, scientific inquiry, and especially gender, and highlights the complexity and variability of sexualities of both across historical periods and in relation to race, class, ethnicity and nation. The course also introduces the concept of engaged research and the public service component of LGBT activity.

SWGS 496: Engaged Research Practicum, Valdez
TBA
An applied research complement to the Seminar consisting of six hours/week participating in a research-based project at a local public service agency that addresses the needs of women or is focused on gender and/or sexuality related work. Planning for the practicum takes place during the previous fall semester in consultation with the SWGS Director. Practicum projects are presented to a public audience. Permission of the instructor and some background in the study of women, gender or sexuality required. (Taken concurrently with SWGS 497; see below.)

SWGS 497: Engaged Research Seminar, Valdez
W 3–5:30 PM
Taken in conjunction with SWGS 496, the Seminar develops students’ research skills and situates the practicum project within a range of perspectives on feminist theory and practice, grassroots organizing, and policy-making around the issues of women, gender, and sexuality, for example, domestic violence, gender and the prison industry, reproductive freedom, the feminization of AIDS. Permission of the instructor and some background in gender or sexuality studies are required.